3 in 10 Black Employees Say Discrimination to...

PARN Global News Article - 8 January 2018

3 in 10 Black Employees Say Discrimination to Blame for Failing to Achieve Their Career Expectations

3 in 10 Black Employees Say Discrimination to Blame for Failing to Achieve Their Career Expectations

A new survey of over 1,200 UK employees by the CIPD, the professional body for HR and people development, examines BAME employee career progression

29% of black employees say that discrimination has played a part in a lack of career progression to date, almost three times as many as white British employees, according to a new survey of over 1,200 UK employees by the CIPD.

One in five BAME employees (20%) said that discrimination had played a part in a lack of career progression to date, compared to just one in ten (11%) white British employees. This comes despite the fact that significantly more BAME employees said career progression was an important part of their working life than those from a white British background (25% vs 10%).

When asked what would improve their career progression, BAME employees were much more likely than white British employees to say that seeing other people like them that have progressed in the organisation, and a greater diversity of people at senior levels in their organisation would help boost their career progression. Additionally, the survey found that a quarter of BAME respondents (23%) whose organisations don’t provide mentoring said they would find it useful in achieving their potential at work.

Dr Jill Miller, Diversity and Inclusion Adviser at the CIPD, said: “There is clearly still a long way to go until we can say that equal access to progression opportunities exists regardless of ethnic background. Discrimination is totally unacceptable - everyone has the right to bring their whole selves to work without fear of prejudice or victimisation and employers have a duty to provide a workplace that delivers that. Progress is crucial, and some of the fundamentals of business need to change to avoid having this conversation again in five years’ time.

Read the full report and CIPD’s diversity guidance

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